National Avg. Salary

$93,610 More Salary Data →

Job Growth Rate

24.5% More Growth Data →

Recommended Degree

Master's Programs & Degrees →

Attributes

  • Good Entry Level Salary
  • Skill-Based Work
  • Working With People

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While midwives are most commonly known as individuals who assist during births, the role of the midwife extends throughout pregnancies and potentially after birth. They counsel expecting mothers during pregnancies, assist during births, and provide advice and guidance to new parents after births.

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Job Description

The following job responsibilities are common for individuals in midwife roles:

  • Perform exams and provide prenatal care to expecting mothers
  • Deliver babies when mothers go into labor, and assist physicians when emergency procedures—such as caesarian sections—are required
  • Teach new mothers how to properly breastfeed their newborn babies and how to use pumps
  • Provide pediatric care and offer advice and guidance to the parents of newborn babies
  • Counsel women of reproductive ages on the importance of safe sex, and provide STD education

A Day in the Life

Recognized as an occupation and career with a history that goes back more than 3,000 years, midwifery involves pregnancy, childbirth, and newborn care. Modern midwives have become true experts and assist with a growing number of births. In the United States, midwives are equipped with the knowledge and experienced needed to handle common birth complications, such as breech births. However, patients are sent to obstetricians for more complicated issues.

With the growth of the midwife as a career, the scope of the profession has also increased. While previous midwives may have been responsible only for the period of pregnancy and for a short duration after the child is born, many midwives today have taken a more holistic approach and are primary care providers for women on a long-term basis. They have extensive knowledge in sexual and reproductive health as well as prenatal and postpartum concerns.

Most midwives are hired at the beginning of a pregnancy, and their primary responsibility during this early period will be to conduct physical examinations to track fetal development as well as the health of the mother. Additional tasks will include maintaining health records and referring women to specialists when needed, such as for a caesarean section delivery. Many midwives also provide childcare instruction after the birth as another service to clients.

Typical Work Schedule

Most midwives work full-time schedules. While the bulk of their work may be conducted during regular business hours, they are also required to be on call during all hours of the day, weekends, and holidays to deliver babies when patients go into labor.

Typical Employers

Midwives are most commonly self-employed, though they may have close relationships with obstetricians in their area with whom they exchange referrals. Midwives typically operate their own businesses and take on clients on a freelance basis. However, they may also work as nurses or assistants in hospitals or the offices of OBGYNs.

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Midwife Salary Data

We've provided you the following to learn more about this career. The salary and growth data on this page comes from recently published Bureau of Labor Statistics data while the recommendations and editorial content are based on our research.

National Annual Salary

Low Range

$73,460

Average

$93,610

High Range

$132,270

National Hourly Wage

Low Range

$35/hr

Average

$45/hr

High Range

$64/hr

How do Midwife salaries stack up to other jobs across the country? Based on the latest jobs data nationwide, Midwife's can make an average annual salary of $93,610, or $45 per hour. On the lower end, they can make $73,460 or $35 per hour, perhaps when just starting out or based on the state you live in.

Salary Rankings And Facts

  • #83 Nationally for All Careers

  • Above Average Salary Nationally

What Will Your State Pay?

State Hourly Annual
California $00.000 $00.000
Texas $00.000 $00.000
Florida $00.000 $00.000
Washington $00.000 $00.000
Tennessee $00.000 $00.000

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How To Become

To study for a career in midwifery, there are many universities and organizations that offer both undergraduate and alternative-entry graduate programs. In the case of the latter, an existing graduate degree, such as one in nursing, is required and will lead to certification as a nurse midwife (CNM). While this certification is licensed in every state, other midwife certifications do vary from state to state and you’ll need to ensure that you are correctly licensed for the state where you wish to practice.

Apart from the CNM, the other three primary designated certifications are as a Certified Professional Midwife (CPM), Certified Midwife (CM), or Licensed Midwife (LM). Of these, becoming a CPM has the lowest barrier to entry, and you will need to complete a program approved by the Midwifery Education Accreditation Council. However, this certification is only available in 28 states and does not give the midwife the ability to prescribe medicine.

As with many medical careers, maintaining a CNM or CM license will require that you complete continuing education courses on a regular basis. This is done every five years and will also include retaking the certification test. For those with a CPM license, the cycle is shorter and you’ll need to be recertified every three years. Common continuing education learning might include gestational diabetes, midwife ethics, neonatal resuscitation, or other pregnancy-related topics.


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Quick Summary

  • Optional

    In many states, a graduate degree is required to become licensed as a midwife, but some states allow for midwife licensing with only a bachelor’s degree.

  • Recommended Min. Degree

    Master's

Programs and Degrees

Here are the most common degrees for becoming a Midwife. a Master's is usually recommended and specifically a degree or coursework that prepares you for the particular field, see below.

Highest Education Among Midwife

  • 13.5%   Doctorate
  • 77.7%   Masters
  • 5.8%   Bachelors
  • 1%   Associates
  • 1.2%   College
  • 0.6%   High School
  • 0.3%   Less than High School

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Job Growth Projections and Forecast

2014 Total Jobs

5,300

2024 Est. Jobs

6,600

Job Growth Rate

24.5%

Est. New Jobs

1,300

How does Midwife job growth stack up to other jobs across the country? By 2024, there will be a change of 1,300 jobs for a total of 6,600 people employed in the career nationwide. This is a 24.5% change in growth over the next ten years, giving the career a growth rate nationwide of Above Average.

Growth Rankings And Facts

  • #30 Nationally for All Careers

  • Above Avg. Growth Nationally

Is There Growth in My State?


State No. of Jobs Job Growth
California 00% 00%
Texas 00% 00%
Florida 00% 00%
Nevada 00% 00%
New York 00% 00%
Chicago 00% 00%

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What Companies Employ The Most Midwifes

Industry Current Jobs New Jobs Needed % Increase
Offices of physicians 2,400 500 1%
General medical and surgical hospitals; private 0000 0000 0000
Offices of all other health practitioners 0000 0000 0000

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